Wisconsin Dairy Council


Chocolate Milk: Nature's Recovery Drink

Athletes need an ideal ratio of carbohydrate to protein to replenish energy used during exercise and support muscle recovery. Recent studies show, and coaches agree, low-fat chocolate milk naturally provides this winning ratio of nutrients more effectively than most sports drinks. (View Study)

Click a Drink to Compare >

Chocolate Milk
Fat-Free (Skim) Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) White Milk
Apple Juice
Sports Drinks
Soda
Energy Drinks
Sports Recovery Drink
Specialized Recovery Powder
Water
Vitamin Water
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Compare Drinks

Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Fat-Free (Skim) Chocolate Milk
150 Calories 130
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 8
24 Carbohydrate (g) 24
190 Sodium (mg) 200
430 Potassium (mg) 440
300 Calcium (mg) 300
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 3.0:1
Per 8 oz serving
Per 8 oz serving
Fat-Free (Skim) Chocolate Milk : Like low-fat chocolate milk, skim or fat-free chocolate milk provides the same unique combination of nutrients as low-fat chocolate milk that an athlete needs to refuel after a workout. The fat content does not change the carbohydrate to protein ratio. Fat-free milk contains less than .5 grams of fat per serving.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Low-Fat (1%) White Milk
150 Calories 110
2.5 Fat (g) 2.5
8 Protien (g) 8
24 Carbohydrate (g) 13
190 Sodium (mg) 135
430 Potassium (mg) 381
300 Calcium (mg) 300
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 1.5:1
Per 8 oz serving
Per 8 oz serving
Low-Fat (1%) White Milk : White milk or unflavored milk is a natural form of milk that contains nine essential nutrients which include: high quality protein, carbohydrate, and electrolytes that can be part of a healthy diet and can be used for sports recovery. The main difference between white milk and chocolate milk is the total carbohydrate (natural and added sugar) which impacts the carbohydrate to protein ratio. Additionally, white milk may have different fat contents ranging from fat-free (.5 grams per serving or less) to whole milk (8 grams per serving).
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Apple Juice
150 Calories 120
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 0
24 Carbohydrate (g) 29
190 Sodium (mg) 10
430 Potassium (mg) 290
300 Calcium (mg) 0
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 0
Per 8 oz serving
Per 8 oz serving
Apple Juice : Like chocolate milk, 100% fruit juice offers some electrolytes, carbohydrates and fluid. However, 100% fruit juice does not contain protein.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Sports Drinks
150 Calories 130
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 0
24 Carbohydrate (g) 34
190 Sodium (mg) 270
430 Potassium (mg) 75
300 Calcium (mg) 0
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 0
Per 8 oz serving
Per 20 oz serving
Sports Drinks : Many athletes choose sports drinks because they contain both carbohydrate and electrolytes. However, unless the sports drinks are fortified most lack beneficial protein and other essential nutrients found in chocolate milk. Sports drinks also tend to be more expensive than nutrient-rich chocolate milk and contain mostly added sugar.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Soda
150 Calories 140
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 0
24 Carbohydrate (g) 39
190 Sodium (mg) 75
430 Potassium (mg) 0
300 Calcium (mg) 0
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 0
Per 8 oz serving
Per 12 oz serving
Soda : Soda contains empty calories in the form of sugar which has no nutritive value. Soda doesn’t provide any significant levels of nutrients and does not contain protein.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Energy Drinks
150 Calories 115
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 0
24 Carbohydrate (g) 28
190 Sodium (mg) 214
430 Potassium (mg) 0
300 Calcium (mg) 0
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 0
Per 8 oz serving
Per 8 oz serving
Energy Drinks : Energy drinks contain caffeine levels up to almost 250 milligrams which is equivalent to three cups of coffee. Caffeine has varying effects on people, so a safe level has not been determined. Energy drinks also contain other stimulants and taurine which may negatively impact sports performance, heart, digestive system and electrolyte balance. Most do not contain protein for muscle repair and recovery. The Wisconsin Interscholastic Athletic Association (WIAA) prohibits these substances in connection with high school athletic programs.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Sports Recovery Drink
150 Calories 230
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 16
24 Carbohydrate (g) 41
190 Sodium (mg) 220
430 Potassium (mg) 80
300 Calcium (mg) 0
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 2.5:1
Per 8 oz serving
Per 16oz serving
Sports Recovery Drink : After exercise, a key nutrient in muscle recovery is protein. Whey protein from milk is the protein source used in many sports recovery drinks. These beverages also contain added sugar and electrolytes. Sports recovery drinks lack other essential nutrients such as calcium and vitamin D that athletes need and can cost 4 times more than great tasting, nutrient-rich, chocolate milk.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Specialized Recovery Powder
150 Calories 270
2.5 Fat (g) 1.5
8 Protien (g) 13
24 Carbohydrate (g) 52
190 Sodium (mg) 11
430 Potassium (mg) 190
300 Calcium (mg) 100
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 4.0:1
Per 8 oz serving
Per 2 scoops makes 12 oz serving
Specialized Recovery Powder: Like commercial sports drinks the focus of these powders are carbohydrates and electrolytes. However protein is included. These beverages contain a lot of added sugar (11 teaspoons per serving). Cost is a consideration as these beverages tend to be 5-10 times more expensive than the cost of chocolate milk.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Water
150 Calories 0
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 0
24 Carbohydrate (g) 0
190 Sodium (mg) 0
430 Potassium (mg) 0
300 Calcium (mg) 0
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 0
Per 8 oz serving
Per 16 oz serving
Water: Water is the most important nutrient the human body needs on a daily basis. Water has an essential role in many processes in the human body. Water is needed to maintain proper hydration, before, during and after activity. Adequate hydration is essential in sports performance. All beverages contain water, for example, nutrient-rich milk, contains 90% water.
Chocolate Milk
Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk       Vitamin Water
150 Calories 125
2.5 Fat (g) 0
8 Protien (g) 0
24 Carbohydrate (g) 32
190 Sodium (mg) 0
430 Potassium (mg) 175
300 Calcium (mg) 0
3.0:1 Carbs to Protien 0
Per 8 oz serving
Per 20 oz serving
Vitamin Water : Much like regular water, vitamin-fortified water can help keep the body hydrated. However it may contain high levels of added sugar and does not contain protein.
Chocolate Milk

Low-Fat (1%) Chocolate Milk

Low-fat chocolate milk helps athletes refuel after a workout by providing protein, carbohydrate and electrolytes (calcium, potassium, sodium and magnesium). While many other beverages contain both carbs and electrolytes, most lack the added benefit of protein found in low-fat chocolate milk. Low-fat chocolate milk provides a source of easily digested high quality whey protein to promote protein synthesis. Low-fat chocolate milk is naturally rich in bone-building calcium and fortified with vitamin D and it has the right mix of carbohydrate to protein. Low-fat milk contains 3 grams of fat per serving.


The following resources will help coaches, parents and athletes with important nutrition information to supplement their training regimen. These resources developed by the Wisconsin Milk Marketing Board remind high school athletes about the importance of healthy eating. Also included is information about chocolate milk, the natural sports recovery drink.

 

Team PowerPoint Presentations

Coaches, these three powerpoint presentations will guide your teams with science-based nutrition concepts to fuel them before, during and after practice or completion. Presenter notes included.

Game Day Meal Order Form

Coaches, team up with your school foodservice manager and use the Game Day Meal Order Form to provide nutrient-rich foods for your athletes for away games or after school.

Print these downloadable Sports Nutrition Infographics to share with your team.



The Athlete's Plate

Chocolate Milk: The Ideal Post-
Workout Recovery Beverage

Whey Protein: Farm to Table

 

Start When You Finish

Research supports chocolate milk for athletes. Communicate the power of chocolate milk as a refueling drink after physical activity with this handout.

Sports Nutrition Quiz


Every coach and athlete should know how proper nutrition can affect workouts and enhance performance. Learn more about the correct timing and fuel sources an athlete needs before, during and after a workout. This quiz will cover the general concepts of sports nutrition to maximize an athlete's performance.

Are you ready to test your Sports Nutrition knowledge?

got chocolate milk?™


Intense competition requires serious recovery. Chocolate Milk has what it takes to help you recover and perform your best. Learn more about the research and the science behind lowfat chocolate milk at www.gotchocolatemilk.com.

Additional Sports Nutrition Downloads for Your Athletic Program


Valuable sports nutrition information in downloadable format to be copied and distributed to athletes and those interested in sports nutrition.

Coaches:
Send this letter to your athletes' parents to explain why chocolate milk is such an essential part of their child's training.
Parent Letter

Booster Clubs:

Boost Your Bottom Line With Chocolate Milk

 

Chocolate Milk: Lowfat Milk -- Nature's Recovery Drink


Information about chocolate milk as an excellent alternative sports beverage choice.

Sports Nutrition Links


Questions and Answers


  1. Does Muscle Milk® actually contain milk?
  2. Doesn't chocolate milk have too much sugar and caffeine in it?
  3. Will drinking milk before the big competition coat my throat or give me dry mouth?
  4. What is the best sports drink?
  5. I ran out of energy during practice. What happened?
  6. What should I eat for meals and snacks?
  7. Can I eat whatever I want to celebrate a big win?
  8. What if I am lactose intolerant?
  9. Will extra milk help my broken bone heal faster?
  10. What is whey protein and what is the best source of it?
  11. Does milk cause lactic acid development?
  12. Are carbs fattening?
  13. In order to lose weight, should I skip meals?
  14. Do I need to consume supplements in order to take in essential amino acids?
  1. Does Muscle Milk® actually contain milk?

    No. Muscle Milk® should be labeled as a nutritional shake or a supplemental beverage. In fact, consumers are purchasing a water-based product that does not contain milk.

  2. Doesn't chocolate milk have too much sugar and caffeine in it?

    Actually, one cup of chocolate milk has less caffeine than a cup of decaffeinated coffee and only has 2.5 teaspoons of added sugar, far less than other sport beverages and soda.

  3. Will drinking milk before the big competition coat my throat or give me dry mouth?

    Nervousness and anxiety typically cause mouth dryness, not milk. If you believe milk coats your throat, drink it 2 to 3 hours before the event or be sure you have enough milk with your replacement meal to make 3 servings for the day. Or, chase pre-game milk with a chug of water to clear your throat and mouth.

  4. What is the best sports drink?

    Most teens drink 2-3 times as many sugar sweetened beverages (soda, flavored tea, sports drinks, fruit drinks) than they do milk. Choosing other beverages means you may not get the calcium you need—90% of teen girls and 70% of teen boys don't get the important 3 servings of milk needed every day. Include milk in your daily plan, along with plenty of water and 100% fruit juice. Don't replace milk with soda and sports drinks. Drink sports drinks during or immediately after practice, sipping a sports drink during the day at school increases your sugar and calorie intake. Choose milk 3 times daily and choose water as often as possible throughout the entire day.

  5. I ran out of energy during practice. What happened?

    A quick candy bar or sugary soda will not give you the energy needed to last for 60-90 minutes of intense activity. Choose foods high in complex carbohydrate (like cereal, whole grain bread and pasta) for energy to last the whole practice. Keep a water bottle handy and be sure to sip water throughout practice to stay hydrated.

  6. What should I eat for meals and snacks?

    Successful athletes plan out their meals and snacks. A good rule is to eat 3 meals and 2-3 snacks each day. Experts agree that all meals and snacks should have at least one complex carbohydrate source such as whole grains, cereals, fruits and veggies in order to meet energy needs. A good quality protein is needed at least twice a day, usually at lunch and dinner, to provide your body with muscle-building amino acids. Athletes also need 3 servings of milk, cheese and yogurt to maintain bone health and to fuel their bodies with 9 essential nutrients. Refuel with lowfat chocolate milk 15-30 minutes after your activity to repair, refuel and rehydrate your body.

  7. Can I eat whatever I want to celebrate a big win?

    Muscles need high carbohydrate foods after hard exercise as an energy replacement. Flavored or lowfat milk is a quick replacement drink loaded with carbohydrates and protein. Within 30 minutes of a big game or practice, pair carbohydrate and protein foods such as yogurt and fruit, cheese and crackers or peanut butter and bread with milk for a quick and easy meal. Once you have eaten the healthy foods your body needs, adding a treat such as cookies, chips or candy can always be fun.

  8. What if I am lactose intolerant?

    Some people have problems digesting milk if they are lactose intolerant. For these individuals, small amounts of milk with a meal and most types of yogurt and cheese can usually be tolerated. Carbohydrate and protein in milk do slow digestion time. If you feel any sort of stomach upset, it might be helpful to drink milk either 3 or more hours before an event or with the first meal after the game.

  9. Will extra milk help my broken bone heal faster?

    Drinking extra milk will not speed up the healing process of a broken bone. But the calcium from dairy products will help prevent broken bones from occurring. There is strong evidence that poor intakes of calcium over time, usually related to replacing the milk you need with soda or fruit drinks, can make bones more susceptible to breaks.

  10. What is whey protein and what is the best source of it?

    Whey protein is a high-quality protein naturally found in dairy that contains all of the essential amino acids, the building blocks your body needs to perform at its best. Whey protein naturally occurs in milk and many manufacturers are using milk solids as a source of whey protein in their "sports" drinks.

  11. Does milk cause lactic acid development?

    No, lactic acid is a product of anaerobic energy production. When you work out, you stress the fibers in your muscles, causing them to break down. When these fibers break down, muscular acidosis or lactic acid build up in the muscle tissue occurs.

  12. Are carbs fattening?

    No, excess calories are fattening. Carbs are an important fuel for the muscles. To lose weight, it is important to provide your body fuel through the day with quality calories so you have energy to exercise.

  13. In order to lose weight, should I skip meals?

    Inadequate nutrition is the #1 reason for athletic burnout. Do not skip meals. Regardless if you feel hungry or not, your body needs energy.

  14. Do I need to consume supplements in order to take in essential amino acids?

    No, if you are consuming foods that contain complete protein sources, or a food that provides all of the essential amino acids, you do not need a supplement. You may also hear these sources called high-quality proteins. Animal-based and dairy foods contain complete proteins. The two most important amino acids are isoleucine and leucine and foods like chocolate milk, cottage cheese and tuna are great sources.

 

Do you have additional sports nutrition questions? Email us at wdc@wmmb.org.